Menu

Jem Mace: The Transformational Pugilist

Jem Mace (1831-1910) was arguably the greatest boxer that pre-dated the twentieth century, Mace would be regarded along with Daniel Mendoza the most influential boxer of the bare-knuckle era. James Corbett would famously exclaim about Mace, “the man whom to whom we owe the changes that elevated the sport.” Mace…
Submit to DeliciousSubmit to DiggSubmit to FacebookSubmit to Google BookmarksSubmit to StumbleuponSubmit to TechnoratiSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn

Professor Mike Donovan: Practitioner and Teacher

Professor Mike Donovan (25-4-7) was born on 1847 in Chicago and eventually became both one of the greatest teachers and practitioners of the sport. Donovan was a fighter who despite fighting mainly between welterweight and Jr. middleweight would often fight opponents that exceeded 200 pounds. The “Professor” moniker was christened…
Submit to DeliciousSubmit to DiggSubmit to FacebookSubmit to Google BookmarksSubmit to StumbleuponSubmit to TechnoratiSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn

The Forgotten Commonwealth Champion

Every year thousands of people, armed with flip-flops, tanning lotion and expensive cameras, flock to Bridlington to escape the stresses of their everyday lives and take in the intoxicating holiday atmosphere.As you walk through the bustling town centre, you hear the joyful melodies of fruit machines bursting through the doors…
Submit to DeliciousSubmit to DiggSubmit to FacebookSubmit to Google BookmarksSubmit to StumbleuponSubmit to TechnoratiSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn

Andy Ganigan: The Hawaiian Punch!

He was one of the most dangerous lightweights of his era. Andrew Ganigan of Hawaii was not blessed with the best of chins. His live by the sword, die by the sword style of fighting made him a crowd-pleasing favorite. In most cases Andy got to his opponent first thus…
Submit to DeliciousSubmit to DiggSubmit to FacebookSubmit to Google BookmarksSubmit to StumbleuponSubmit to TechnoratiSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn

Mexican Heavyweight Manuel Ramos

When you think of Mexican fighters it is usually a tough little hombre like a Ruben Olivares, Vincente Saldivar or Julio Cesar Chavez. More often then not the better boxers from Mexico scaled under 160lbs. In an exception to the rule during the mid 1960’s to the early 70’s this…
Submit to DeliciousSubmit to DiggSubmit to FacebookSubmit to Google BookmarksSubmit to StumbleuponSubmit to TechnoratiSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn
Subscribe to this RSS feed

Our Sponsors

Sections

Ringnews24 Ratings

Popular Tags

Tools

About Us

Connect With Us